It’s time to end trapping in New Mexico

It’s time to end trapping in New Mexico

My entire life, identity and work has centered around New Mexico’s incredible array of public lands and the diverse wildlife inhabiting those lands. We New Mexicans are truly blessed. It’s no surprise that so many of us, including myself, flock to the soul-nourishing...

UPDATE: Please Support Senate Bill 32 (Roxy’s Law) – Urge your New Mexico state legislators to support Roxy’s Law

UPDATE: Please Support Senate Bill 32 (Roxy’s Law) Dear TrapFree New Mexico Friends, We wanted to be sure you saw this alert from TrapFree NM partner, Animal Protection Voters. Click on the link below to send a message right now to your legislators, some of whom...
Las Cruces Sun-News: It is time for New Mexico trapping laws to catch up

Las Cruces Sun-News: It is time for New Mexico trapping laws to catch up

On a warm November morning, a man taking a stroll through the amazing trails south of Santa Teresa discovered a pile of some forty dumped animals. What he first thought were dead greyhounds turned out to be coyotes. They had been killed and skinned, and left with only...
Albuquerque Journal Editorial: Nothing about traps is New Mexico True

Albuquerque Journal Editorial: Nothing about traps is New Mexico True

BY ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL EDITORIAL BOARD Monday, December 7th, 2020 at 12:02am New Mexicans have worked hard over the years to do right by the animals in our state. We have banned cockfighting, horse tripping and coyote-killing contests. We have made dog fighting a...
Sierra County Sun: New Mexico: Land of Entrapment

Sierra County Sun: New Mexico: Land of Entrapment

by Mary Katherine Ray | December 4, 2020 Many people are surprised to learn that fur trapping—the exploitative relic of the 1800s—still goes on today in our crowded, fragile world. Worse, the steel-jawed devices and wire neck-snares that trappers still use can be...
Albuquerque Journal: Dogs caught in traps rekindle debate in NM

Albuquerque Journal: Dogs caught in traps rekindle debate in NM

SANTA FE – Terry Miller of White Rock was walking her two dogs through the Jemez National Recreation Area on Thanksgiving Day when she heard a sharp scream. She turned around to find her dog, Jessie, a 2-year-old Dutch shepherd, with one of her paws caught in a metal...
Las Cruces Sun-News: ‘Pretty gruesome:’ Skinned coyote carcasses piled in desert likely the work of trappers

Las Cruces Sun-News: ‘Pretty gruesome:’ Skinned coyote carcasses piled in desert likely the work of trappers

LAS CRUCES – On Nov. 20, a man on his morning walk discovered multiple piles of dead and skinned coyotes off a main road near Santa Teresa. Kevin Bixby, executive director of the Southwest Environmental Center in Las Cruces, went to the site to check out the scene on...
Outdoor recreationists encounter horrors during the first three weeks of the ‘20-‘21 trapping season

Outdoor recreationists encounter horrors during the first three weeks of the ‘20-‘21 trapping season

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE November 25, 2020 New Mexicans are warned of gruesome sights and danger while on public lands over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend—on the two-year anniversary of the death of “Roxy,” the dog who became the namesake for anti-trapping legislation...
Farmington Daily Times: Trapping season is underway and dog walkers should take precautions to protect pets

Farmington Daily Times: Trapping season is underway and dog walkers should take precautions to protect pets

AZTEC — It isn’t unusual for James Stackhouse’s husky, Ivy, to disappear for a couple minutes while they are out hiking. She’s never out of sight for long and, at first, he didn’t think much about her absence as they were hiking near Lake Farmington on Nov. 14....

New Mexico public lands at risk as trapping season begins

For Immediate Release October 30, 2020 Contacts: Chris Smith, WildEarth Guardians, 505-395-6177, Jessica Johnson, Animal Protection Voters, 505-220-6656, Private, commercial traps will be hidden across BLM, Forest...
When tourists or their dogs step into traps, you can kiss new outdoor recreation industry goodbye

When tourists or their dogs step into traps, you can kiss new outdoor recreation industry goodbye

By Sherry Robinson New Mexico wants the traveling public to think of the state as a destination for outdoor recreation. For those of us who hike, bike, fish, hunt, and golf, that seems pretty obvious. The tourism industry and economic developers are on board. However,...

New Mexico commission approves wildlife trapping changes

ALBUQUERQUE — Trappers now have to complete an education course and new restrictions will be imposed on setting wildlife traps and snares around designated trailheads and on select tracts of public lands in New Mexico under a measure adopted Friday by the State Game...

New Mexico Game Commission adds restrictions on trapping in divided vote

LAS CRUCES — The New Mexico State Game Commission voted 5-2 to extend certain restrictions on trapping during its public meeting in Las Cruces Friday. The change mandates that anyone purchasing a trapping license undergo a mandatory trapping education course that...

New Mexico Game Commission approves trapping, disregarding public opposition

Wolves, pets remain at risk The New Mexico Game Commission approved trapping of bobcats, foxes, and other wildlife throughout the state on January 17. The decision reauthorizes the use of leghold traps, body-crushing traps, and strangulation snares that have killed...

MY VIEW: Trapping will damage tourism

It is hard to believe the state ⏤ always in need of revenue ⏤ is intentionally acting to decrease its most dependable revenue stream: tourism. This is unimaginable; the state is acting to purposely lose residents and tourists by condoning and actively perpetuating...

Speak out to oppose trapping on public lands

New Mexico has a problem with traps on public lands. The ongoing destruction inflicted by hidden, baited, steel jaw traps is well documented. Users of public lands, companion animals and wildlife, including endangered species, continue to suffer the harm inflicted by...